What RVers Should Do When Tornados Threaten

Even the weather forecasters say it’s early for tornados but they are already in the news. Here’s some tips for RVers traveling in Tornado Alley:

Warnings… What to Listen for:

Warning signals may differ in different locations. The RV Park manager should be able to tell you what to listen for. If not, contact the local police department (on a non-emergency line).

TORNADO WATCH: The early alert. Tornadoes are possible where you are located. Remain aware of approaching storms. Local radio and television stations will broadcast the alert.

TORNADO WARNING: A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. If a tornado warning is issued for your area and the sky becomes threatening, move to your pre-designated place of safety. The Fire Department will sound alarms.

The sound of a tornado is classically described as being similar to that of a speeding freight train rumbling in the distance.

What to Look for:
Some environmental clues to watch for:
* Dark, often greenish sky
* Turbulent, swirling clouds
* Large hail
* Loud roar; similar to a freight train

Caution: Some tornadoes appear as a visible funnel extending only partially from a cloud. Likely, below the visible funnel a column of rotating air that cannot yet be seen until it begins to pick up dirt and debris as it touches down.

Make the decision!

Every year, many folks are killed or seriously injured by tornados despite advance warning.

Being prepared and staying up to date with timely severe weather watches and warnings, could save your life in the event a tornado threatens where you are. After you have received the warning or observed threatening skies, YOU must make the decision to seek shelter before the storm arrives. It could be the most important decision you will ever make.

Get More Info on Preparing for Tornados at RVbasics.com
——————-

RV Living in the 21st Century: The Essential Reference Guide for ALL RVers For anyone considering or experiencing the RV lifestyle, this book is a wide-ranging tour of things you need to know. Peggi McDonald, a Canadian with extensive (20 years on the road) RV knowledge; been there, done that. She shares the kind of information and advice that enable people to build their competence and confidence as part-time or full-time RVers. Fran and I are proud to have Peggi as our friend.

 
 

Share This Post

Post Comment